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PROGRAMMING THE INTERNET
GRAHAM SPENCER
GOOGLE VENTURES
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2012

LECTURE ABSTRACT

Despite incredible improvements in computing power in the past half century, a programmer from 1960 would find their craft largely unchanged in 2000. But in the last decade, radical changes in computer hardware have forced computer scientists to rethink the way programming should work. Programs no longer run in sequence on one trusted machine; now they are spread across thousands of machines separated by thousands of miles, and only some of those machines can be trusted. In this talk, I will describe recent changes in both infrastructure and programming methodology that allow engineers to write internet-scale programs.


GRAHAM SPENCER BIO
Graham was one of the original 6 founders of Excite.com and was the Chief Technology Officer of the company until its sale to
@Home. At Excite, Graham built core search and ads technology, launched one of the first large-scale services that was personalized to user interests, and oversaw product teams that deployed some of the first social applications on the internet. Graham was also a co-founder of JotSpot, which was acquired by Google in 2006. JotSpot built one of the first commercial wikis that allowed private teams to use the same social collaboration models pioneered by Wikipedia. At Google, Graham led the technology team behind some of Google's first social efforts, including open standards for social interaction that reached hundreds of millions of internet users. In 1999, Graham left Excite@Home to co-found DigitalConsumer.org, a 50,000-member non-profit consumer organization dedicated to protecting fair-use rights for digital media. Graham is also on the board of the Santa Fe Institute.

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